Wednesday, July 26, 2017

World Hepatitis Day is on July 28

Canadian Liver Foundation (CLF)

Hepatitis C affects approximately 300,000 Canadians - and 44% of those affected are unaware.

That is why Hepatitis C is commonly referred to as a silent disease -- often no symptoms appear until the liver is severely damaged, and can lead to liver disease, cancer, and death.
  • According to a 2016 survey, over 80 per cent are unaware of this increased risk, and only 25 per cent have been tested.
  • Canadian Liver Foundation’s recent survey also uncovered that 35% of Canadians don’t know what steps to take to get tested. 
  • Take the Hepatitis Risk Assessment quiz. 

Canadians born between 1945-1975 should get tested as per a recommendation issued by the Canadian Liver Foundation because:

  • Those born between 1945 and 1975 are up to five times more likely to be infected by hepatitis C than other adults.
  • Those who might be infected might not know because there may be no symptoms.
  • Many infected people live up to 20 or 30 years without ever feeling sick.
  • Hepatitis C can be contracted through contact with the blood of an infected person, but those infected by an infected individual might not be remember or know when this could have happened.
  • There are new treatments available that can cure hepatitis C and prevent further liver damage.
  • To access our Publication Library or to order some of our materials, click here. 

What is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus that attacks the liver. It is known as a silent disease because often no symptoms appear until the liver is severely damaged. Many people who are infected never feel sick and/or recover completely - whereas others experience brief, acute illness with fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice. Some people cannot fight the virus and develop chronic hepatitis, which can lead to cirrhosis (liver scarring), liver failure and/or liver cancer.

Brain tumour surgery

When my late father had his brain tumour removed, I must admit there was some shock. When I saw him, both of his eyes were bruised. He had a large semicircle of staples at the time. The scars remained. No one told me that this bruising was from the surgery. I cried, as I thought dad had fallen.

What they also didn't tell us, was the headaches are common with brain tumours. He had many signs of pain, which I thought at the time. Staff were reluctant to relieve his pain.

John McCain, after his surgery. You can clearly see his bruising.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Your Doctor App Could Amplify Your Health Anxieties


This is the most patronizing piece. Just because patients have questions and concerns doesn't make them hypochondriacs/means they have anxiety disorders https://t.co/TBW2nNdawa
— Erin Gilmer (@GilmerHealthLaw) July 23, 2017

Friday, July 14, 2017

Complaints about Retirement homes

This is the crux of the matter. Vulnerable residents, people with severe and chronic issues shouldn't be placed in a Retirement Home.

Public Register


Moment Manor Orleans

Orléans seniors' home inspected 28 times in last 3.5 years

Provincial agency 'watching' Moments Manor, where an elderly man wandered off and was later found dead

"since Moments Manor opened in November 2013, it has been visited 28 times by provincial inspectors."


Call 1·800·361·7254 to reach an experienced Information Officer.
Important Notice
Reporting requirements under the Retirement Homes Act, 2010 (the “Act”) came into force on May 17, 2011. Under the Act, there is an obligation to make a report to the Registrar of the Retirement Homes Regulatory Authority (the “RHRA”) if you suspect any harm or risk of harm to a resident resulting from improper care, abuse or neglect, or unlawful conduct. There is also an obligation to report suspicions of misuse or misappropriation of a resident’s money. Residents may make a report, but the Act does not require them to.
To make a report, call the CRIS line at 1-800-361-7254

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Poison Ivy and contact dermatitis

Another bout: June, 2017

My history of poison ivy. It was July, 2011, the nurse identified the first infection in triage, but I didn't get strong enough salve to eradicate it. The ointments got it if it was an small infection.

2012-01-31 Lyderm ointment
2013-09-08 Prednisone. Bad bout: back for more: 6 tabs for four days; 5 tabs 2 days; 3 tabs @ 2 days, 2 tabs @ 2 days; etc. (54 x 5mg=  270mg ttl)
2014–08–01 Prednisone, 5mgs/5 days, didn't work.
2014–08–05 Prednisone  Dosage: 8 tabs for three days; 6 tabs for three days; 4 tabs for three days, 3 tabs @ 3 days; etc. (63 x 5 mg = 315mg total) 
2015-08-19 Prednisone, 5mg. Take  8 tabs for two days; 6 tabs 2 days; 4 tabs for 2 days, 2 tabs @ 2 days (40 x 5mg = 200mg total)
2017-06-20 Betaderm ointment didn't work.
2017-01-01 Prednisone, 50 mgs  @ 7 days = 350mg. Feeling pretty woozy.


Treatment of Severe Poison Ivy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Long Versus Short Course Oral Prednisone . 2014 Dec; 6(6): 429–434.

Published online 2014 Sep 9. doi:  10.14740/jocmr1855w
PMCID: PMC4169084




Verdict is in... poison ivy. Put the citiot in the country and see what happens!

First bout in the summer: July, 2011.

poison ivy rash = contact dermatitis
It took two months to percolate in my system.
It spread where ever the blisters opened.
I used cremes to stop the itching, pain killers to sleep.
It spread from arm to arm, then to my stomach, up my arms, down my belly and so on.


The full story;


  • 3 ER visits, 
  • 2 GP visits, 
  • 1 dermatologist, 
  • total 6 doctors, 
  • 3 nurses, (the first one, triage nurse, said poison ivy, but no one listened!)
  • 1 student Phys. Assistant-Ben Affleck-look-alike to do the biopsy, 
  • 2 cremes, 
  • 4 pain Rx. 
The worst is over. But it took months to hibernate in my system.

Delightfully spreading ivy; poison ivy patch
I mistakenly used the same gloves to stack wood, a month after the plants had died and I had touched some to remove them.
Here are the healthy plants close up!


Lesson learned!
biopsy on my belly,
where it spread

Saturday, June 24, 2017

US Healthcare ACA vs. Trumpcare



Friday, June 16, 2017

Canadian VIirtual Hospice Medication Resources: e.g., Fentanyl


ENEWS -- June 2017
 
SPOTLIGHT 
MEDICATIONS: FENTANYL AND MORE

Medications play a key role in managing symptoms of people receiving palliative care. Their proper use helps ensure the safety of those administering the medications and best outcomes for people receiving care. The misuse of fentanyl is creating headlines in Canada and fear in patients who are being prescribed the opioid, and their families. To help you navigate this important issue, we’ve developed a new Asked and Answered for the public and two Quick Consults for health providers.

Our thoughts are with those who mourn the deaths of people they care about from fentanyl overdoses.
 

FOR EVERYONE
ASKED & ANSWERED - FENTANYL
I’m concerned about what I hear in the media about fentanyl. Is fentanyl safe to use? How do I use my patch safely? Read our Asked & Answered.

FOR PROFESSIONALS
QUICK CONSULT - SAFE FENTANYL PRACTICES
This Quick Consult describes how to safely handle a transdermal fentanyl patch as well as liquid preparation of fentanyl.

FOR PROFESSIONALS
QUICK CONSULT – SAFE USE OF OPIOIDS WITH PALLIATIVE CARE PATIENTS
This Quick Consult provides information about the current opioid issues in Canada and suggests ways for health care providers to address the concerns of patients and families.

FOR PROFESSIONALS
VIDEO - PRESCRIBING MEDICATIONS IN PALLIATIVE CARE: PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS (08:55)
Dr. Amber Hartman, clinical pharmacy specialist with the Division of Palliative Medicine at Ohio State University, discusses the benefits and challenges of prescribing medications in palliative care. She also explores prescribing for patients with multiple co-morbidities. See also: Prescribing Medications in Palliative Care: Evaluating the Patient’s Goals of Care (01:38), What is Polypharmacy? (01:44) and The Pharmacists Role in Palliative Care (03:28).

FOR EVERYONE
TOPICS ARTICLE - HELP WITH MEDICATIONS
This article provides tips for caregivers about managing and the safe use of medications. Giving medications safely, using a symptom diary to keep track of medications, washing your hands before and after touching medication are some of the topics covered.

FOR PROFESSIONALS
MORE MEDICATION RESOURCES
 

FOR EVERYONE
MORE MEDICATION RESOURCES
 

NEW ON VIRTUAL HOSPICE


FOR PROFESSIONALS
 RESOURCE: PAN-CANADIAN FRAMEWORK FOR PALLIATIVE AND END-OF-LIFE CARE RESEARCH
This document outlines current gaps in palliative care research and provides a road map for the direction for future research efforts in the area of palliative care.

FOR EVERYONE
VIDEO - 100 MINUTES WITH AARON
In this video (13:43), a couple shares the story of their experience with perinatal hospice and the short time they spent with their son Aaron after he was born. 

FOR PROFESSIONALS
 
RESOURCE - LGBTQ-INCLUSIVE HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO TRANSFORMING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
This book written by Kimberly D. Acquaviva provides information for health care providers to support and enhance their palliative care practice with the LGBTQ community. Practical information and guidance is offered, along with strategies for care and intervention.

FOR PROFESSIONALS
RESOURCE - SUPPORTING LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANS PEOPLE WITH CANCER
This document by Dr. Julie Fish and Dr. Perlita Harris; De Montfort University, the ESRC and MacMillan Cancer Support uses case study examples from the perspective of an LGBT person, to highlight some of the unique needs and considerations of LGBT people when facing a cancer diagnosis.

FOR EVERYONE
‘YOUR STORIES’ - LOVE IS THE GREATEST HEALER
“This is my first significant loss through death of a loved one. My heart feels the pain and sorrow that, inevitably, we all must encounter at some point.” A woman shares insights about the death of her beloved uncle.

FOR EVERYONE
COURSES – FUNDAMENTALS OF SPIRITUAL CARE IN PALLIATIVE CARE
This course provided by the HealthCare Chaplaincy Network is for those who wish to improve their delivery of spiritual care in health care. Learn how to become effective administrators of spiritual care programs in palliative care and hospice settings, develop an approach to communicate palliative care clearly as an option to patients, family members, and friends, and create and sustain programs that meet both human and institutional needs. See also Online Certificate Course 2: Advanced Practice Spiritual Care in Palliative Care

NEWS


NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY
On June 21, we celebrate the heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding achievements of First Nations, Inuit and MĂ©tis! Here are some resources to check out: